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Showing posts with label foods. Show all posts
Showing posts with label foods. Show all posts

Sunday, September 30, 2012

Brain Foods

Salmon: High in Fatty Acids and Omega-3. Salmon assists the repair and development of tissues that increase brain activity. Salmon can also prevent age related disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease.

Flax Seeds: being high in alpha-lionolenic acid (ALA). A fat that is healthy for the brain improves function of the brains cerebral cortex that processes all the sensory information.  

Blueberries: provide an array of functions when it comes to brain activity. Consisting of high levels of antioxidants, blueberries help in any form of radical damage and are known to improve memory functions. Blueberries have also been known to reverse the effects of ageing by improving motor functions.  

Coffee: drinking coffee regularly has been proven to reduce, mental disorders such as Dementia, Alzheimer's and many other. Caffeine is good for the brain and is known to be high in antioxidants. However, it is important to remember not to mix your coffee with any artificial sweeteners because that significantly reduces the positive impact of caffeine on you body.  

Green Tea: having two cups a day has proven to lower the risk for cognitive impairment. Green tea can protect you from Parkinson's disease and other related mental disorders. Studies have shown that green tea increases dopamine that increases positive moods and healthy muscle functions.  

Mixed Nuts: walnuts, pecans, peanuts, and most nuts have properties that aid you in fighting insomnia and promote mental clarity. Walnuts are rich in Omega-3 and are a natural mood enhancing stimulant.  

Eggs: are known to improve memory functions.  

Whole grains: whole grains are exceptional brain foods that improve circulation of the brain and comprise of vitamins as well as Omega-3. Whole grains include whole grain bread or oatmeal. 

Chocolate: the yummiest of all brain food. Chocolate is rich in antioxidants and also improves focus and concentration. In addition, chocolate has the ability to enhance your motor skills and memory.

Avocados: the fat in an avocado is not one to be afraid of. It improves the blood flow and keeps the functioning of your brain at optimal level. Avocados are a considered the best alternate to medicine when you need to reduce your blood pressure. So, if you want to keep your mind sharp and nourished these ten highly effective brain foods will not only improve your memory, mood, concentration, and over all clarity, but will also prevent you from any forms of age related disorders.

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

5 Powerful Foods that Lower Your Blood Pressure

Are you eating enough of these 5 amazing foods that help reduce high blood pressure?

Did you know that stroke and coronary heart disease still remain to be on the list of the top three main causes of death in the USA? It's time to take your health seriously so you don't fall victim to these!

What is High Blood Pressure and how does this come into play?

According to the National Institute for Health, blood pressure levels of 140/90 mmHg or more can be classified as hypertension.

The worst part about having high blood pressure is that the condition can sometimes be present without any symptoms and before we know it, the damage is already extensive. Serious problems that have been associated with high blood pressure include kidney failure, heart attack, heart failure and stroke.

What are the Risk Factors Associated with High Blood Pressure?

Blood pressure can be influenced by a lot of factors – age, race, family history, tobacco use, sedentary lifestyle, diet, binge drinking, and stress levels. Chronic conditions such as sleep apnea, diabetes and high cholesterol levels can also precipitate the development of hypertension.

What can You Do to Lower Blood Pressure?

You don't need potentially dangerous drugs to control and reduce your blood pressure. Controlling blood pressure levels could be as simple as doing lifestyle modifications and eating healthier.

If you are a smoker, quit. If you drink heavily, try to practice self-control. At work, take the stairs instead of the elevator. And if you have been obsessed with sweet, sugary foods as well as processed fast-food meals, then modify your eating habits as well. Learn to eat the right kinds of food before it's too late.

Below are 5 of my top picks for powerful foods that could help you lower your blood pressure levels:

1. Artichokes - artichokes help lower blood pressure

The use of artichokes has been implicated in the lowering of cholesterol levels in the blood. Since hypercholesterolemia is one of the risk factors for high blood pressure, this information is actually good news. Three clinical trials conducted separately by Dr. Barbara Wider supports this fact. In Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews’ October 2009 issue, where the result of the study was published, it was shown that patients who were diagnosed with hypercholesterolemia and given Artichoke leaf extract exhibited a decrease in their blood cholesterol levels.

Artichokes taste amazing steamed (generally steam for about 1 hour) and then dip each piece into a mixture of olive oil, grass-fed butter, and garlic. Delicious!

2. Bananas - bananas cut high blood pressure

A study published in The New England Journal of Medicine says that incorporating bananas in your day-to-day meals can actually cut stroke-related deaths by as much as 40 percent. A 1997 study at Johns Hopkins University recommended eating at least five bananas daily to achieve the desired effect, and that is to lower elevated blood pressure levels. However, a study conducted by Indian researchers at the Kasturba medical college revealed that people who eat two bananas a day, for one whole week, can lower their blood pressure levels by 10 percent.

Bananas are rich in potassium, which is responsible for the proper functioning of the heart. It works with sodium to maintain balance of the body’s fluids, which is an important factor in the regulation of blood pressure.


3. Beets - compounds in beets beat blood pressure

A research study conducted by scientists from Barts and The London School Medicine revealed that simply drinking one 500 ml glass of beetroot juice each day can produce astounding health benefits, especially to the heart.

Beetroot juice has been found to lower high blood pressure levels. Professors Amrita Ahluwalia and Ben Benjamin, from the William Harvey Research Institute and Peninsula Medical Center, respectively, led the research efforts, which revealed that the consumption of dietary nitrate that is found in beetroot has BP-lowering effects in as fast as 1 hour after ingestion, with the effect lasting for up to 24 hours. The result of the study was published in the March 2008 issue of Hypertension.

You can try beetroot juice, or also try baked beets sliced on salads or as a side dish to dinner.


 4. Cocoa - cocoa helps lower blood pressure

A study conducted by researchers from Germany’s University Hospital of Cologne revealed that cocoa can significantly lower high blood pressure levels. Study results were published in the Archives of Internal Medicine. The beneficial heart effects of cocoa are attributed to its flavonoid content, specifically procyanids.

Because cocoa is most commonly found in chocolate, people falsely assume that eating a lot of chocolate could be good for the health. Keep in mind that cocoa in chocolates have undergone a lot of processing, and it has been mixed with loads of sugar, so this is not totally healthy. The best way to take advantage of the health benefits offered by cocoa is to choose raw cacao – it is good for the heart, the brain and the liver. Raw cacao nibs go great in smoothies! Also use organic cocoa powder in smoothies or homemade hot cocoa sweetened with stevia instead of sugar.


5. Garlic - garlic fights hypertension
Are you eating enough of these 5 amazing foods that help reduce high blood pressure?

Researchers from South Australia’s University of Adelaide have conducted studies, which provide solid proof that the consumption of garlic can indeed help lower elevated blood pressure levels. Garlic supplements in powder form were given and results revealed that it produced a reduction in systolic blood pressure. Garlic has been known all over the world as a very important herb, especially with its heart-protecting capabilities. It helps lower blood cholesterol levels and prevents blood from forming clots (which could lead to heart attack and stroke).

Furthermore, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal has published the results of a laboratory test showing how garlic juice can lead to a decrease in blood pressure levels. Eating the equivalent of 2 cloves of garlic each day can significantly contribute to the health of the heart.

Check this out to discover over 37 additional herbs, spices, and powerful foods that KILL high blood pressure.

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

10 Best Foods For Your Heart

Take good care of your heart. It's the only one you've got. Take heart with berries, beans, and other healthy fare. Here as some foods that are good for the heart.

Oatmeal
Start your day with a steaming bowl of oats, which are full of omega-3 fatty acids, folate, and potassium. This fiber-rich superfood can lower levels of LDL (or bad) cholesterol and help keep arteries clear.

Opt for coarse or steel-cut oats over instant varieties—which contain more fiber—and top your bowl off with a banana for another 4 grams of fiber.

Salmon
Super-rich in omega-3 fatty acids, salmon can effectively reduce blood pressure and keep clotting at bay. Aim for two servings per week, which may reduce your risk of dying of a heart attack by up to one-third.

"Salmon contains the carotenoid astaxanthin, which is a very powerful antioxidant," says cardiologist Stephen T. Sinatra, MD, the author of Lower Your Blood Pressure In Eight Weeks. But be sure to choose wild salmon over farm-raised fish, which can be packed with insecticides, pesticides, and heavy metals.

Not a fan of salmon? Other oily fish like mackerel, tuna, herring, and sardines will give your heart the same boost.


Avocado
Add a bit of avocado to a sandwich or spinach salad to up the amount of heart-healthy fats in your diet. Packed with monounsaturated fat, avocados can help lower LDL levels while raising the amount of HDL cholesterol in your body.

"Avocados are awesome," says Dr. Sinatra. "They allow for the absorption of other carotenoids—especially beta-carotene and lycopene—which are essential for heart health."


Olive oil
Full of monounsaturated fats, olive oil lowers bad LDL cholesterol and reduces your risk of developing heart disease.

Results from the Seven Countries Study, which looked at cardiovascular disease incidences across the globe, showed that while men in Crete had a predisposition for high cholesterol levels, relatively few died of heart disease because their diet focused on heart-healthy fats found in olive oil. Look for extra-virgin or virgin varieties—they're the least processed—and use them instead of butter when cooking.

Nuts
Walnuts are full of omega-3 fatty acids and, along with almonds and macadamia nuts, are loaded with mono- and polyunsaturated fat. Plus, nuts increase fiber in the diet, says Dr. Sinatra. "And like olive oil, they are a great source of healthy fat."

Berries
Blueberries, raspberries, strawberries—whatever berry you like best—are full of anti-inflammatories, which reduce your risk of heart disease and cancer.

"Blackberries and blueberries are especially great," says Sinatra. "But all berries are great for your vascular health."

Legumes
Fill up on fiber with lentils, chickpeas, and black and kidney beans. They're packed with omega-3 fatty acids, calcium, and soluble fiber.

Spinach
Spinach can help keep your ticker in top shape thanks to its stores of lutein, folate, potassium, and fiber.

But upping your servings of any veggies is sure to give your heart a boost. The Physicians' Health Study examined more than 15,000 men without heart disease for a period of 12 years. Those who ate at least two-and-a-half servings of vegetables each day cut their risk of heart disease by about 25%, compared with those who didn't eat the veggies. Each additional serving reduced risk by another 17%.

Flaxseed 
Full of fiber and omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, a little sprinkling of flaxseed can go a long way for your heart. Top a bowl of oatmeal or whole-grain cereal with a smidgen of ground flaxseed for the ultimate heart-healthy breakfast.

Soy
Soy may lower cholesterol, and since it is low in saturated fat, it's still a great source of lean protein in a heart-healthy diet.


Look for natural sources of soy, like edamame, tempeh, or organic silken tofu. And soy milk is a great addition to a bowl of oatmeal or whole-grain cereal. But watch the amount of salt in your soy: some processed varieties like soy dogs can contain added sodium, which boosts blood pressure.

Everyone knows that it is beans.
"Beans, beans, good for the heart.
The more you eat, the more you fart
The more you fart, the better you feel
So eat more beans for every meal."

Saturday, February 12, 2011

Foods That Fight Cancer

Are you afraid that trying to eat healthily will drain your wallet? Not to worry -- some of the healthiest foods in the world are actually very, very cheap. Planet Green lists a number of foods that are great for your body but won't break the budget:

Kale

It's loaded with vitamin C, vitamin B, and calcium, and costs just over a dollar a bunch.
Broccoli and Cabbage

These low-cost cruciferous vegetables neutralize toxins in your liver.

Winter Squash

It's just a few dollars a pound, it's a good source of vitamin B6 and folate.

Sweet Potatoes

They're full of fiber, protein, vitamin A, and vitamin C.

Adzuki Beans

Adzuki beans contain some of the highest levels of protein of any variety of beans, and they also contain high levels of potassium, fiber, B vitamins, iron, zinc, and manganese.

Black Beans

These are a good source of folate, dietary fiber, manganese, protein, magnesium, vitamin B1 (thiamin), phosphorus, and iron.
Sunflower Seeds

Raw sunflower seeds contain 76 percent of the RDA for vitamin E.
Almonds

Almonds are good for heart health and loaded with vitamin E.

Saturday, August 23, 2008

10 Foods That Build The Bones

Crab legs//© Rusty Hill/FoodPix/Jupiterimages

1. Alaskan King Crab

High in protein and low in fat, the sweet flesh of the king crab is spiked with zinc — a whopping 7 milligrams per 3
.5-ounce serving. "Zinc is an antioxidant, but more important, it helps support healthy bone mass and immune function," says Susan Bowerman, assistant director of the Center for Human Nutrition at the University of California at Los Angeles.

"Several studies have linked adequate zinc intake to increased immunity and decreased incidences of respiratory infection
." And you can reap all these benefits by swapping one of your weekly fish meals for a six-ounce serving of crab.

Dried plums//© J.Bilic/Photocuisine/ age fotostock

2. Dried Plums

Also known as prunes, these dark shrivelers are rich in copper and boron, both of which can help prevent osteoporosis. "They also contain a fiber called inulin, which, when broken down by intestinal bacteria, makes for a more acidic environment in the digestive tract," says Bowerman. "That, in turn, facilitates calcium absorption." Enjoy four or five a day to strengthen your bones and boost your energy.

Bok choy//© Michael Paul/StockFood Creative/Getty Images

3. Bok Choy

This crunchy cruciferous vegetable is more than the filler that goes with shrimp in brown sauce. "Bok choy is rich in bone-building calcium, as well as vitamins A and C, folic acid, iron, beta-carotene, and potassium," says celebrity trainer Teddy Bass. Potassium keeps your muscles and nerves in check while lowering your blood pressure, and research suggests that beta-carotene can reduce the risk of both lung and bladder cancers, as well as macular degeneration. Shoot for a cup a day.

Oysters//© David Prince/FoodPix/Jupiterimages

4. Oysters

Shellfish, in general, is an excellent source of zinc, calcium, copper, iodine, iron, potassium, and selenium. "But the creamy flesh of oysters stands apart for its ability to elevate testosterone levels and protect against prostate cancer," says Bass. "They aren't a food most people will eat regularly, but getting five into your diet twice a week will make your weekends more fun."

Bananas//© Tom Grill/Getty Images

5. Bananas

Athletes and performers are familiar with the calming effect of bananas — a result of the fruit's high concentration of tryptophan, a building block of serotonin. But their real benefit comes from potassium, an electrolyte that helps prevent the loss of calcium from the body.

"Bananas also bolster the nervous system, boost immune function, and help the body metabolize protein," says Bass. "One banana packs a day's worth of potassium, and its carbohydrate content speeds recovery after strenuous exercise."

Kiwis//© Michael Rosenfeld/Getty Images

6. Kiwis

Like bananas, this fuzzy fruit is high in bone-protecting potassium. "They're also rich in vitamin C and lutein, a carotenoid that can help reduce the risk of heart disease," says Bowerman. "I try to eat at least one or two a week after exercising." Freeze them for a refreshing energy kick, but don't peel the skin: It's edible and packed with nutrients.

Broccoli//© Thomas Barwick/Getty Images

7. Broccoli

Our president's dad may hate this cruciferous all-star, but one cup of broccoli contains a hearty dose of calcium, as well as manganese, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, and iron
. And that's in addition to its high concentration of vitamins — including A, C, and K — and the phytonutrient sulforaphane, which studies at Johns Hopkins University suggest has powerful anticancer properties.

"One cup a day will do the trick," says Bowerman
. Try cauliflower, kale, brussels sprouts, or cabbage for variation, as all possess many of the same nutritional qualities. "Broccoli may also help reduce excess estrogen levels in the body, thanks to its indole 3-carbinol content," says celebrity trainer Gunnar Petersen.

Spinach//© FoodCollection/age fotostock

8. Spinach

A renowned muscle builder, spinach is also rich in vitamin K, which has been shown to bolster bone-mineral density (thus protecting against osteoporosis) and reduce fracture rates. Spinach is also high in calcium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, and even selenium, which may help protect the liver and ward off Alzheimer's.

One more reason to add it to your diet: A study in the Journal of Nutrition suggests that the carotenoid neoxanthin in spinach can kill prostate cancer cells, while the beta-carotene fights colon cancer. "Popeye was on to something," says Bowerman. "Eat one cup of cooked spinach, or two cups raw, four times a week."

Leeks//© E. Jane Armstrong/FoodPix/Jupiterimages

9. Leeks

These scallion-like cousins of garlic and onions are packed with bone-bolstering thiamine, riboflavin, calcium, and potassium
. Leeks are also rich in folic acid, a B vitamin that studies have shown to lower levels of the artery-damaging amino acid homocystein in the blood.

What's more, "Leeks can support sexual functioning and reduce the risk of prostate cancer," says Michael Dansinger, MD, an assistant professor of medicine and an obesity researcher at
Tufts-New England Medical Center, in Boston. "Chop the green part of a medium leek into thin ribbons and add it to soups, saut├ęs, and salads as often as possible."

Artichokes//© FoodCollection/age fotostock

10. Artichokes

Lauded for centuries as an aphrodisiac, this fiber-rich plant contains more bone-building magnesium and potassium than any other vegetable. Its leaves are also rich in flavonoids and polyphenols — antioxidants that can cut the risk of stroke — and vitamin C, which helps maintain the immune system. "Eat them as often as you can," says Bowerman. Ripe ones feel heavy for their size and squeak when squeezed.